Calling all Medine cousins!

 

Medine family photo at the Pleasant Hill farm
The only known photograph of the Gustaf Medine family, taken about 1911 at Gustaf’s Pleasant Hill farm in Mayfield, IL. Photo Source: Drake family photos

I’m looking to reconnect with any relatives of the Medine family from DeKalb County, Illinois!

This semester, I took an online Genealogy course at University of Illinois with genealogist Nicole W. Miller. I feel like I learned so much about developing trends in genealogy, and I developed better practices for researching and sourcing my own family history. One of my accomplishments was writing a formal compiled genealogy for the Medine family. I realized that there are still some close Medine cousins that I know very little about! I would love to reconnect and share family stories with their descendants. If you are descended from any of the relatives listed below, please connect with me by commenting on this post! I know the basic information for each of these people, but I’d love to add more to their biographies! I will definitely share the final genealogy paper with you!

  • Ralph/Harry Shaffer, born about 1913, Illinois. Son of Roy and Julia (Medine) Shaffer. He likely grew up in DeKalb, Illinois, and I believe that he lived in Chicago in 1943. No further information.
  • Leona G. Bowen, born 16 September 1913 in Mayfield, DeKalb County, Illinois and died 4 February 1975 in Sycamore. Daughter of Jesse Scott and Augusta (Medine) Bowen. She married Melvin Ernest Voltz on 25 November 1933 in Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. He was born 27 October 1909 in Illinois and died on 29 October 1983 in Wisconsin.
  • Donald M. Bowen, born 18 November 1916, Sycamore; died 9 December 1989 DeKalb County, Illinois. Son ofJesse Scott and Augusta (Medine) Bowen. He married (1) Edna Eddy on 15 June 1946 and (2) Teresa Mary deRin on 2 September 1949 in Geneva, Kane County, Illinois. Teresa was born 17 January 1921 in DeKalb, the daughter of Anthony and Sylvia deRin, and she died 26 May 1988.
  • Helen M. Bowen, born 11 July 1920, Mayfield; died 27 July 1949, Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. Daughter of Jesse Scott and Augusta (Medine) Bowen. She married Charles Joseph Leonard on 25 April 1940 in Dubuque, Iowa. He was born 25 April 1912 in Illinois to James and Mary Leonard, and died 26 December 1993 in Van Nuys, California.
  • James Leonard Medine, born 30 June 1924, Genoa, Illinois; died 11 December 1944 in France. Son of Fred and Lillian Kleona (Leonard) Medine. He served in the military in WWII and was killed in action. 

I will also be writing a compiled genealogy for Gustaf Medine’s siblings who also settled in DeKalb County, Illinois. They are all the children of Andreas Danielsson and Lena Stina Svensdottr, born in Smoland, Sweden, and emigrated here in the 1880’s. Their original last name was Andreasson, and they all changed it to Medine when they arrived in Illinois. Please contact me if you have any additional information about the following individuals! Thank you!

  • Peter Sven Medine was born 9 June 1858 in Mistelås, Kronoberg County, Sweden, and died 12 January 1930 in Sycamore, Illinois. He married Mathilda Johnson (1861-1925) in DeKalb County, Illinois on 9 December 1887. They had four children, all born in DeKalb County: Harry William Medine (1888-1964), Arthur Albert Medine (1890-1972), Carl Edward Medine (1894-1987) and Ernest Glenn Medine (1900-1991).
  • Mary/Maria Medine was born 1 May 1856 in Mistelås, Kronoberg County, Sweden, and died 27 Mar 1940 in Sycamore, Illinois. She had one daughter who was born in Sweden, Amanda Helena Medine (1882-1953), who married Alfred A. Reed and Edward Castenson. In 1890, Mary married Andrew Turkelson (1834-1910) in Illinois, and they had three sons: John William Turkelson (1892-1953), Rienhold Turkelson (1895-1910) and Carl Victor Turkelson (1897-1970).
  • Helen Medine was born 1 March 1863 in Mistelås, Kronoberg County, Sweden, and died 15 November 1948 in Maywood, Cook County, Illinois. In 1886, she married Andrew Elmberg (1851-1924). They had one daughter, Maud Victoria Elmberg (1888-1967). Helen later married Herman H. Phillips (1867-1943).
  • Christine Medine was born 5 March 1846 in Mistelås, Kronoberg County, Sweden and died sometime after 1907. She arrived with her father Andreas in Illinois from Sweden in 1899. When Andreas passed away in 1907, she is named as “Mrs. Christine Anderson of Mayfield.” I’m not sure who she married (if she did marry), or when she died, or if she went back to Sweden after 1907. She had a son, born in 1873 in Sweden, named Anders Göran.

On this day: Edwin Drake

On this day, 97 years ago, my grandfather Edwin Drake was born. This precious photo is him as a baby with his mother, Emma (Medine) Drake.

Emma Drake holding her son Edwin
Emma holding Edwin as a baby. Source: Drake family photo.

A Kaiser in the Great War

Today is the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into World War I. My great-grandfather, Glenn Kaiser, joined the army in September of 1917. He served overseas, fighting in Germany in the 127th Infantry, 32nd Division, eventually being discharged in May of 1919. To remember the 100th anniversary of America’s engagement in WWI, I will be sharing some of his intriguing photos from The Great War.

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My great-grandfather, Glenn M. Kaiser, in his Army uniform during WWI. He served overseas in Germany, primarily as a cook. (Image source: Kaiser family photo)

Nana was a WWII veteran (part II)

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Millie Kaiser as a WAVE in 1944. (Family photo)

For Women’s History Month, this is Part II of a series dedicated to my grandmother’s WWII military service. Click here to read Part I. 

My Nana, Millie Kaiser, joined the Navy WAVES in 1944 when she was 21 years old, in the middle of WWII. She joined the WAVES because she felt it was the right thing to do for her country. After Basic Training in New York, she had a few days leave at home, and then she was stationed in Pensacola, Florida. Millie had never been that far away from home before. For her, it was an exciting new adventure.

Daily Life as a WAVE

In early summer of 1944, Millie arrived at Saufley Field Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida. She and the other WAVES that arrived with her were the first girls to be stationed at Saufley. Millie was a Seaman, Second class, and was assigned to Tower Two. Her primary job was to log each plane that went in and out of the airfield, looking for the plane number located next to the propeller. Because the pilots had to log a certain number of in-flight hours for training, Millie had to log each minute that each pilot spent in the air. Some days she was pretty busy, but other days, the hours went by slowly.

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A few of the training planes next to the runway. (Family photo)
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Millie working in Tower Two at Saufley Field. The runway can be seen out the window behind her. (Family photo)

It was usually a pretty uneventful job, but occasionally she had a scare when a pilot “didn’t land quite right.” Although a couple of the accidents were severe, very few of the pilots were badly injured while she was there. The rest of the time, the WAVES in the control tower would pass the time listening to Millie’s radio. One Christmas when she was home, Millie’s father gave her a small radio as a gift. They were not supposed to have personal radios in the barracks, so she kept her radio in the control tower to keep herself and the other girls entertained during those long hours. However, radios were in high demand and it was eventually stolen from the tower one night. She had figured that some of the male soldiers stationed there were eager to listen to the radio and helped themselves to it. Her precious radio was never recovered. After that, they had to keep themselves entertained with stories from home.

Kaiser_Millie_WAVES_family
Millie and her family, when she was on leave between Basic Training and being stationed in Pensacola, FL in June 1944. (Family photo)

Life in the barracks was pretty routine, and everyone would rotate chores. Millie did not enjoy sitting up at night for the overnight watch. She recalled, “We also had a 24-hour watch in the barracks. There would be two of us. Everyone had to be in at a certain time, and then the doors would be locked. If someone was late, then of course we had to let them in. We rotated shifts, and I would have to work nights every so often.” It was not a glamorous life, but it was an important part of the training base. I know that she missed her family and friends back home, but she always felt safe on the air base, and she always knew that she’d make it back home. She was aware that many of the pilots that she met and helped train would not make it home. Her family was very proud of her!

Kaiser, Millie with Fran and Ski 2
Millie and her close friends Fran and Ski (Family photo)

Free Time on Base

Millie made several close friends while she was stationed in Pensacola, and they would make the most of their free time! Stay tuned for Part III to learn more about their adventures…


Sources:

  • Interview with Mildred (Kaiser) Drake, conducted by Eva Weil, 2015.
  • Interview with Mildred (Kaiser) Drake, conducted by Eva Weil, 2005.
  • Photos from private collection, Mildred (Kaiser) Drake’s Pensacola photo album, 1944-1946.
  • Women of WWII website

One year old!

This blog turns one year old today! This year has certainly gone by fast! To celebrate, here’s a photo of my first birthday. I guess the frosting was better on my face, rather than in my mouth.

weil_eva_baby_1stbdaycake_cropped

From Mexarp to Mayfield

This semester I’m elated to be taking a course in Genealogy and Library Services. As part of the class, I’ll be focusing my research on the Medine family in Illinois. An introduction to their story is below.

Our family has been researching our roots for over 15 years now, and most of our ancestral lines have been traced back to the immigrant ancestor. I’ve just started doing some research on our ancestors in the Old Country. Lately, I’ve been tracing the lives of my great-great grandfather, Gustaf Medine, his siblings, and his parents in Sweden and America. This has certainly been a puzzle!

Medine family photo at the Pleasant Hill farm
The only known photograph of the Gustaf Medine family, taken about 1911 at Gustaf’s Pleasant Hill farm in Mayfield, IL. Front row: Katharina (Schroder) Medine, Gustaf Medine, William Medine, Jesse Scott Bowen. Back row: Fred Medine, Julia Medine, Augusta (Medine) Bowen, Emma (Medine) Drake, Charles Drake. Source: Personal family photo

I love the family photo above. Gustaf’s sun-darkened, stern face shows the years of hard work behind him. He is leaning forward, as if eager to get back to work. His children look a lot like their mother, and have softer, more humorous looks. Fred, who will turn out to be the most mischievous character in years to come, looks especially devious. Katharina appears to have her hand behind her back, perhaps to hold onto his knee so he doesn’t fidget. The three sisters were very close, and opt to stand next to each other instead of close to their husbands. Overall, you can tell that there is a lot of love between all of them, and through any struggles that they had, they were there for each other. In their faces I see weariness from the toughness of life on the farm. However, I also see determination, strength and a resolve to survive.

Gustaf Medine was my grandfather’s grandfather, and he came to DeKalb County from Sweden in the 1880’s. He was married to Katharina Schroder, who was from Germany. They had met in Germany and married either there or in Sweden. They had six children, and they lived on a farm in Mayfield township in DeKalb County, Illinois. Gustaf eventually purchased a farm from the local abolitionist Ira Douglas. My grandfather knew Gustaf when he was very young, and spent a lot of time on that old farm. Even through troubled times, the Medine family was very close-knit. However, we didn’t know hardly anything about their time back in Sweden.

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Gustaf’s father was Andreas Danielsson, who died in Sycamore in December 1907. This is his obituary which appeared in the Sycamore True Republican on December 14, 1907. It lists Gustaf as one of his children. Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collection

Through Ancestry.com, I recently connected with a Medine cousin. After sharing stories and a couple photos, she mentioned that when the family came from Sweden, they changed their name from something else to Medine. Bingo! I had never been able to locate any immigration records under their Medine names. Now I had a lead! I combed through some old local DeKalb County newspapers and found Gustaf’s father’s obituary. His last name: Danielson!

So, where did Danielson come from? After some investigation, I discovered that it was Swedish surname custom to add “-son” or “-dottr” to your father’s first name to create your surname. So, Gustaf Medine’s original name was Gustaf Andreasson, and his father’s original name was Andreas Danielsson. When Gustaf and his siblings each arrived in DeKalb County, Illinois, they began using “Medine” as their surname.

I eventually located Andreas’s immigration records to the USA, giving me his hometown in Sweden, which lead me to church and household records from their hometown. Andreas Danielson was married to Lina Stina Svensdottr (women didn’t change their surname when they married) and they had eight children: Kristina (b. 1846), Johann Daniel (b. 1851), Gustaf (b. 1853), Ingrid Maria (b. 1856), Peter Sven (b. 1858), Johannes (b. 1861), Helena (b. 1863), and Otto (b. 1872). Sadly, Otto died on Christmas Day when he was just a few months old. (Source: Ancestry.com)

They lived near a tiny village called Mexarp, in Mistelås parish in Smöland, Sweden. That area of Sweden has rocky soil and forests of thin trees. The trees and rocks are cleared to make way for farmland or grazing. Andreas was a farmer, but when his children became of age, opportunities for work must have been difficult. The countryside was becoming more and more overpopulated, and there weren’t enough farming jobs to go around. In the late 1860’s severe weather caused several crop failures and famine was widespread in the area. The first mass emigration was between 1868 and 1873, exactly in the time frame of the Andreasson family dispersal (source). Most of the Andreasson children left when they were in their 20’s, moving to Germany and America.

Moheda
A view of a farm in Moheda, Kronoberg, Sweden, which is a parish next to Mistelås. Image source: Flickr

About 1871, Johann Daniel and Gustaf moved to Germany after spending some time in Denmark a few years before. Kristina briefly moved to Germany and had a son out of wedlock. Mary and Peter Sven both moved briefly to other towns in Sweden, then home again. Mary had a daughter as a single mother in 1882. Between 1881-1885, many of the siblings had moved to North America, most ending up in DeKalb County, Illinois. Peter Sven, Mary (with her daughter Amanda), Gustaf (and his new German wife Catherine and their new baby Amelia) and Helen all settled in Mayfield township in Illinois. Johannes and Kristina’s son Anders also apparently moved to North America, but I’m not sure where. Johann Daniel stayed in Germany.

Life was better for the family when they arrived in America. Gustaf and Peter eventually purchased their own farms. Helen and Mary got married and lived nearby. When their mother Lina Stina Svensdottr died in 1897, the children must have convinced their father to move to America with them. In 1899, Kristina traveled with her father Andreas to Mayfield township to live. They arrived in the USA with $5 in their pocket. He lived for a couple years with Gustaf, and later with Helen, where he passed away in 1907.

Passenger Manifest for Andreas and Kristina Danielsson
Passenger List of the S.S. New England, arrived from Liverpool, England to Boston, Massachusetts in July 1899. Andreas Danielsson and his daughter Kristina were on the ship, heading to Peter Medine’s farm near Sycamore, IL. Source: Ancestry.com

Life must have been difficult for Gustaf and his family. Both in America and Sweden, they lived in a very rural community where they were dependent on the land for survival. They certainly lived in poverty in Sweden, and were forced by crop failures to leave their homeland in search of a better life. Gustaf moved to Germany to start a new life, then about 10 years later, started over again in Mayfield township. Gustaf spoke Swedish, and his wife spoke German, and when they moved to America, they had to learn English. They were poor in America too, but eventually saved enough to buy their own farm. Life wasn’t easy for others in his family, either. His sisters Kristina and Maria were single mothers, and were likely supported by others in the family. While her siblings were able to venture off to other countries, Kristina had to stay in Sweden to take care of her aging parents. Andreas likely had to sell the farm when the crops failed, and by the time he moved to the USA, he was a pensioner still living on the farm.

This semester I hope to learn even more about this family. What was their life like in Sweden? Is there more family in Sweden that I haven’t found yet? When exactly did Gustaf and the others come to America? Why did they decide to settle in Mayfield? Where did the rest of the family go? Why did they change their name when they arrived in Mayfield, Illinois? Why did they choose Medine as their new last name? Stay tuned for more stories from the Old Country!


Sources:

C.D.C. Johnson 1954-2017

Johnson_Claurence_portrait.jpgA short time ago, the world lost a great man and my husband lost his father. My words can’t do justice to his legacy. He was a man who loved his children more than anything in the world, and did everything he could to give them a better life. He believed in hard work, perseverance, family ties and the value of education. He taught his children these values as well. He sacrificed so much to raise four children on his own.

He was born in Guyana, where he lost his father at an early age. He educated himself and became a teacher at the age of 16. Like all young men, he served in the military, and eventually served in the office of the President of Guyana. He married in his late 20’s and had four children. He moved the family to St. Lucia for better opportunities, then later moved to the Bahamas. He raised four young children on his own. He bought a run-down house, and worked hard to make it the best house on the block. He taught his children how to paint, put in flooring and tile. He taught them that if you don’t know something, the answer can be found at the library. He was a teacher and inspired countless other young people to work hard for their dreams. He found time to write poetry, leaving an impressive collection of sonnets, ballads and narratives. He even published one young adult novel. In 2008, he relocated to the United States, where his children had or were attending college. He wore many hats during his lifetime, but his most rewarding job was that of a father.

He also believed in strong family ties and connecting with family. He helped organize large family reunions in Guyana and was one of the founders of the “Gillis/McCammon Family Reunion Organization.” Because of his efforts, much of the family is in contact with each other through the annual family reunions in Hopetown. He kept the rich family stories alive. I hope to do my part to keep them going to his future grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

An essential part of family history is remembering the family stories and legacies of those who have gone before you, and who are now part of you. Family values, just like family heirlooms, are passed down carefully to each generation. My husband is a great man because he had a great role model in his father. I feel honored that he was a part of my life for the past 8.5 years. He’ll be missed dearly.

 

His obituary is posted here.